Major Overview

An individual who studies Precision Metal Working will gain the technical knowledge and skill to create products and structures using metals. There are many different concentrations within this major; some of them are Machine Tool Technology, Machine Shop Technology, Sheet Metal Technology, Welding Technology, Tool and Die Technology, Ironworking, Computer Numerically Controlled Machinist Technology, and Metal Fabricator.

While focusing on these concentrations you will be taking courses in welding, metalworking, shop mathematics, mechanical drawing, physics, and chemistry. This major is commonly offered as a certification or Associate's degree.

Required Skills

This program requires a lot of hands-on work and attention to detail. Students should possess physical stamina and strength in order to guide and load heavy materials and parts. Computer skills are needed for many aspects of the job, as well as the ability to read blueprints.

Most programs include a work apprenticeship in order for students to gain essential work experience. You will work alongside professionals in the field, as well as spend time studying and in the classroom.

Career

Individuals who have completed a program in Precision Metal Working have a few different career options available to them. Structural iron and steel workers install girders, steel beams, and columns to form bridges, buildings and other structures. The demand for these professionals is increasing at a faster than average rate. Another job highly in demand is sheet metal workers. These professionals install and develop products that are made from thin sheets of metal. Other jobs graduates go into are welders, cutters, solderers, and brazers, machinists, and tool and die makers.

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Major at a Glance

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Yearly Graduations
 653
Average Starting Salary
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Average Mid-Career Salary
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Related Majors

Explore all the majors withing the field of Precision Production

Example Careers

Here is a small sample of the careers that a degree in Precision Metal Working might open up.

Computer Numerically Controlled Machine Tool Programmers, Metal and Plastic
Computer-Controlled Machine Tool Operators, Metal and Plastic
Cutting, Punching, and Press Machine Setters, Operators, and Tenders, Metal and Plastic
Drilling and Boring Machine Tool Setters, Operators, and Tenders, Metal and Plastic
Extruding and Drawing Machine Setters, Operators, and Tenders, Metal and Plastic
Forging Machine Setters, Operators, and Tenders, Metal and Plastic
Foundry Mold and Coremakers
Grinding, Lapping, Polishing, and Buffing Machine Tool Setters, Operators, and Tenders, Metal and Plastic
Heat Treating Equipment Setters, Operators, and Tenders, Metal and Plastic
Lathe and Turning Machine Tool Setters, Operators, and Tenders, Metal and Plastic
Layout Workers, Metal and Plastic
Machinists
Metal Workers and Plastic Workers, All Other
Milling and Planing Machine Setters, Operators, and Tenders, Metal and Plastic
Model Makers, Metal and Plastic
Multiple Machine Tool Setters, Operators, and Tenders, Metal and Plastic
Patternmakers, Metal and Plastic
Rolling Machine Setters, Operators, and Tenders, Metal and Plastic
Sheet Metal Workers
Structural Metal Fabricators and Fitters
Tool Grinders, Filers, and Sharpeners
Tool and Die Makers
Welders, Cutters, Solderers, and Brazers
Welding, Soldering, and Brazing Machine Setters, Operators, and Tenders
Salary data is estimated by College Factual using 2013 data provided by PayScale.
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